Poetry & Writing

Peter’s Corner: The Rainy Day Rain Man

The first Rain Man was French, and he had a habit of saying “”Après nous, le déluge” meaning “After us, the flood” because he could make it rain very heavily when he wanted to, and because he liked heavy rain. He is now known as the Rainy Day Rain Man because he could not only create rain, but also create rainy days as well. He was known in French as L’Homme des Jours Pluvieux.

He liked the expression “It never just rains, it pours”, and often saved up for a rainy day then having made it rain heavily and go on raining all … Read More »

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Camberwell Art Trail

 

The Camberwell Art Trail consists of 30 street markers embedded into Camberwell’s pavements, designed by Camberwell artists and the local community, including artists and poets from CoolTan Arts.

The trail will be unveiled in Summer 2017 – check the website for updates on the launch date!

Website: www.camberwellarttrail.co.uk

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Poetry Group

Poetry with friends’ laughter never ends

A place where the dish ran away with the spoon

A poem was read from the moon

Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall,

Until the Germans demolished it.

Time came to a standstill and the

Mouse ran up the clock,

Twinkle Twinkle they are stars

Poetry Group best by far.

 

By Gary, in the Poetry workshop

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It came to pass that every Thursday morn,

Strange men arrive at the wall of worth,

It is a tall dark place where

The word of the poets gather to write about the world,

Or do they? There is a darker side of these men,

Not the words of men but the hand of the ice maiden Lisbeth,

No blood runs through her veins

Only ice. We shout let her go

But the key’s master Alison has her

Locked in the wall of Walworth.

We will let the ice maiden go.

The strange men will help her

Shout let her go.

 

 

By Gary, in the Thursday morning poetry class.

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